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Werd

Posted by on Jan 21, 2012 in Uncategorized | Comments Off

Word substitution errors offer a glimpse into the linguistically unconscious.  I swear I learn as much from kids as they do from me. One of the big questions in the fields of neurolinguistics is whether words how words are stored: semantically – according to meaning – and phonetically – according to sound.  A child last week shared their personal linguistic pathway when asked to name pictures. When shown the Picture:  The wonderful name retrieved from long-term memory? “Garden gnome” A great way to preserve to...

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Why some of us learn more from experience

Posted by on Jan 11, 2012 in Uncategorized | Comments Off

I’m always amazed when clients really turn things around.  Or perhaps I’m more amazed when they don’t turn things around.  Regardless, it is undeniable that success breeds success.  When she gains that confidence reading, so many other things fall into place.  When he finally develops a working system of how to keep track of papers going back and forth from home to school, teachers notice, parents notice, and grades reflect it. Why do some people learn from experiences both in session and in the classroom, and others keep...

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Marshmallow, anyone?

Posted by on Nov 30, 2011 in Uncategorized | Comments Off

I’m reposting an important article from Education Week, because it uncovers a better predictor of academic success than IQ: Published Online: September 20, 2011 Published in Print: September 21, 2011, Study Reveals Brain Biology Behind Self-Control —Emile Wamsteker for Education Week By Sarah D. Sparks A new neuroscience twist on a classic psychology study offers some clues to what makes one student able to buckle down for hours of homework before a test while his classmates party. The study, published in this month’s edition...

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Dyscalculia

Posted by on Nov 30, 2011 in Uncategorized | Comments Off

I was just interviewed for this article: I like the wording in the article that Sheldon Horowitz, the guru heading the NCLD, somehow “agrees with me” hehe. I only worry that people will interpret the “math looks fuzzy” too literally. Does it come across that way?

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Creativity in the Brain

Posted by on Nov 30, 2011 in Uncategorized | Comments Off

Well, I admit defeat.  Up to this point, I’ve tried to keep my teaching/learning identity separate from my creative/musical self. Then along came Charles Limb. After watching this TED Talk (Jazz in the fMRI), I can no longer keep creativity out of my sessions, nor self-reflection out of this weekend’s upcoming gig. Favorite points: “Most scientific studies of music…are very unmusical entirely” Ha! Couldn’t agree more. “[In the fMRI,] we have this combination of the [cortical] area thought to be...

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Top five trends of 2010 in individualized learning

Posted by on Nov 30, 2011 in Uncategorized | Comments Off

1. Online School Portals- As of this month, the last North Shore School (surprising who took the longest) now has the ability for parents to know assignment grades before kids get them in class. Pros: smooth flow of information through the “assignment circle (of Doom)-see below.  Cons: the wrong people can tend to the information (read: parent anxiety alert!), and heck, who needs an assignment notebook now? 2. Response to Intervention - the transformation is complete (ly stupefying). By this point, schools are now agents of RTI...

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Just Try Harder?

Posted by on Nov 30, 2011 in Uncategorized | Comments Off

I’ve been thinking about how often we try to solve our kids’ academic difficulties with the decree to “just try harder.” First, I’m always skeptical of any solution that starts with the word “Just…” If it were a simple solution, any reasonable person would have already run across it. Second, who are the people recruiting this decree?  In my experience, many dads, often very successful, want their kids to overcome difficulties by just trying harder.  Another recent cohort I’ve been hearing...

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DSM-V

Posted by on Nov 30, 2011 in Uncategorized | Comments Off

Well, the new DSM-V (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders), the bible of psychology is now drafted, as of this week. My head is swimming, especially considering earlier blogs on semantics and labeling. There is no more Asperger’s Syndrome.  Aspies will now be considered “Autistic Spectrum Disorders.”  What a weird experience, I presume: to have a name you have likely grappled with, identified with, used to find others like you, or explained time after time YANKED out from underneath you.  Now you are...

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Potato, Potahto? Tomato, Tomahto?

Posted by on Nov 30, 2011 in Uncategorized | Comments Off

To build on the post by Anonymous: One of the things we struggle with in our field is terminology. Learning Disabilities? Learning Differences? Dyslexia? Specific Learning Disorders? How can we purport to know anything about learning and it’s individual variations if we don’t even know what to call it? For one, we can rest assured that the choices are better today than they were more than 40 years ago. I would hate to tell a kid to their face that they had “minimal brain damage” or to explain that they were...

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Unfettered Potential

Posted by on Nov 30, 2011 in Uncategorized | Comments Off

I have to fess up to one of my educational fantasies.  Often, I’ll be working with a kid, and I imagine what learning would be like without cognitive roadblocks.  What we ALL would be like without these roadblocks, but especially them, right here and now. I see the seeds of some good idea that the world needs to know about, and it isn’t coming out.  The darn handwriting just doesn’t get it out fast enough before the darn monkeymind jumps on to some new thought.  Or the words weren’t accessible – just stuck right there on the...

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